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Volume 357, Issue 1 p. 27-32
Research letter
Free Access

Expression of the mouse and rat mas proto-oncogene in the brain and peripheral tissues

Rainer Metzger

Rainer Metzger

German Institute for High Blood Pressure Research, Wielendstr. 26, D-69126, Heidelberg, Germany

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Michael Bader

Michael Bader

Max-Delbrück-Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC), Hypertension Research, Bldg. 134D, Wiltbergstr. 50, D-13125 Berlin, Germany

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Thomas Ludwig

Thomas Ludwig

European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse I, Heidelberg, Germany

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Christof Berberich

Christof Berberich

German Institute for High Blood Pressure Research, Wielendstr. 26, D-69126, Heidelberg, Germany

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Bernd Bunnemann

Bernd Bunnemann

German Institute for High Blood Pressure Research, Wielendstr. 26, D-69126, Heidelberg, Germany

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Detlev Ganten

Detlev Ganten

German Institute for High Blood Pressure Research, Wielendstr. 26, D-69126, Heidelberg, Germany

Max-Delbrück-Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC), Hypertension Research, Bldg. 134D, Wiltbergstr. 50, D-13125 Berlin, Germany

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First published: January 02, 1995
Citations: 117
Corresponding author. Fax: (49) (30) 9488 510.

Abstract

We isolated the mas proto-oncogene from a mouse genomic library. Sequence analysis showed that it contains an open reading frame without intervening sequences. The amino acid sequence deduced confirms the seven-transmembrane-domain structure and exhibits 97% and 91% amino acid homology with the rat and the human Mas, respectively. In mice and rats, mas mRNA was detected in the testis, kidney, heart, and in the brain regions: hippocampus, forebrain, piriform cortex, and olfactory bulb. Testicular mas mRNA from rats increases markedly during development, while cerebellar mRNA is high postnatally but completely disappears at later stages. We conclude that the product of the mouse mas gene may be involved in the development of the brain and testis.