Molecular Oncology Author Guidelines


Aims and Scope

Online Submission

Overleaf

Initial submission

Submission of a revised manuscript

Types of paper

Editorial process

Editorial policy

Ethical standards

Human experiments

Animal experiments

Authorship

Data sharing

Open Access publication fee and copyright license

Preparation of the manuscript

Title page

Abstract

Introduction

Material and methods

Data accessibility

Results

Discussion

Conclusions

Acknowledgements

Author Contributions

References

Math formulae

Footnotes

Database linking

Tables

Figure captions

Figures

Preparation of electronic artwork for publication

Supporting Information

Graphical abstracts

Cover illustrations

Publication

Author Enquiries

Accepted Articles published online

Early View

Online proof correction


Aims and Scope

Molecular Oncology is an Open Access international journal that highlights new discoveries, approaches, as well as technical developments, in basic, clinical and discovery-driven translational cancer research.

The emphasis is on work that significantly advances our understanding of disease processes leading to human tumour development and/or establishes novel concepts of clear clinical significance in diagnosis, prognosis and prevention strategies for cancer patients.

Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Key biological processes such as cell cycle; DNA repair; apoptosis; invasion and metastasis; angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis; cell signalling and interactive networks; immune response.
  • Emerging technologies (genomics, proteomics, functional genomics, metabolomics, tissue arrays, bio-imaging), and model systems.
  • Biomarkers: diagnosis, prognosis, stratification and efficacy.
  • Cancer genetics, epigenetics, and genomic instability.
  • Minimal residual disease, pre-malignant lesions.
  • Cancer micro-environment.
  • Molecular pathology.
  • Tumour immunology.
  • Translational research.
  • Cancer therapy (target discovery, drug design, immunotherapy, combination therapies, resistance, and individualised treatment).
  • Chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery.
  • Clinical pharmacology.
  • Clinical trials, integration of basic science into cancer clinical trials.
  • Molecular epidemiology

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Online Submission

Online submission of manuscripts is via https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/molonc

Step-by-step instructions on how to submit your manuscript are available online during the submission process, which does not need to be completed in one session. Any queries can be sent to the Editorial Office (molonc@cancer.dk).

Overleaf

Wiley has partnered with Overleaf, a collaborative, cloud-based authoring tool, to offer you Overleaf Link on Molecular Oncology. Overleaf Link is a dedicated article submission template, where you can write and edit your article in Overleaf, and then submit directly to the journal editorial office.

The article submission template is available here.

For more information, please visit our Overleaf Link webpage.

If you are new to Overleaf there are a number of video tutorials available at this link. If you need any help, we have a direct support arrangement with Overleaf. Please contact them at support@overleaf.com or visit www.overleaf.com/contact.

Initial submission

At initial submission, we recommend that authors submit their text, figures and tables as a single PDF file. Alternatively, the following files will be automatically converted into a single PDF:

  • The manuscript (including title page, abstract, main text, references and tables) saved as a PDF, .doc or .rtf file. Tables should be included after the references.
  • Figures can either be included in the main text file for reviewing purposes, or be provided as separate files (see Preparation of electronic artwork for publication for details of recommended file formats). All figures must be given a figure number.
  • Supporting information (e.g. large datasets or raw data supporting an existing figure; see Supporting Information).

NB Any unpublished papers that are cited must be uploaded as Supporting Documents for referees to access. An electronic copy of any related paper under consideration or in press elsewhere must also be submitted as a Supporting Document; failure to do so may delay the review process.

The following information must be provided during the submission stage:

  • Names, institutions and email addresses of all the co-authors.
  • The names and email addresses of four recommended referees, together with their institutions. Please do not suggest anyone whom you have collaborated or published with in the last 3 years, or scientists based at your own institution, as they will not be approached. Note that the editor retains the sole right to decide whether or not the suggested reviewers are used.

On successful submission, you will receive onscreen acknowledgement with a manuscript reference number. All authors will receive an email acknowledgement.

Submission of a revised manuscript

Please follow the instructions provided in the editorial decision letter. You will need to:

  • Include a point-by-point response to the reviewers’ and editor’s comments.
  • Upload a revised version of the text, including any tables, as a .doc file. Alterations to the text should be highlighted by using track changes in Word. Alternatively, changes can be highlighted in BOLD TYPE. Please ensure that only ONE set of changes is visible.
  • Upload an unmarked copy of the manuscript text as a Supporting Document. (If your paper is accepted for publication, an unmarked copy of the document will be required for displaying in the ‘Recently Published’ articles section of the Journal’s homepage.)
  • Upload separate print-quality figure files in PDF, TIFF or EPS format. It is essential to follow the instructions described below in Preparation of electronic artwork for publication.
  • Upload a short abstract of no more than 60 words and, in a separate file, a small square figure (see graphical abstracts for more information).

Types of paper

Research articles, Reviews (please note these are by invite only) and Science policy articles.

Editorial process

All submitted manuscripts undergo a technical check in the editorial office to ensure they comply with the journal's Guide to Authors. Manuscripts are then assigned to the Editor-in-Chief, who decides whether the article is of sufficient quality for consideration, and if so, invites a minimum of two expert reviews. Reviewers are asked to comment on the originality, quality and clinical relevance of the paper. The editors will make every effort to reach decisions on papers within 5 weeks of the date of submission, although a longer time might be needed for review in holiday seasons. If revision is a condition of publication, we generally allow 3 months. Evaluations of conceptual advance and significance are made based on the literature available on the day of the final decision, not the day of submission. Any major changes after acceptance are subject to review and may delay publication.

Editorial policy

Submission of an article implies that the work described:

  • has not been published previously, except in the form of an abstract or as part of a published lecture or academic thesis; prior or concurrent submission of the manuscript to an institutional repository or a not-for-profit subject-based preprint server does not constitute prior publication;
  • that it is not under consideration for publication elsewhere;
  • that its publication is approved by all authors and tacitly or explicitly by the responsible authorities where the work was carried out

Please note that Molecular Oncology employs a plagiarism detection system and all submitted manuscripts are screened for similarity to previously published works.

All authors are requested to disclose any actual or potential conflict of interest including any financial, personal or other relationships with other people or organizations within three years of beginning the submitted work that could inappropriately influence, or be perceived to influence, their work. Such a disclosure should be included at the end of the main text of the manuscript. See http://www.icmje.org for a form for this purpose

Molecular Oncology endorses the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment.

Ethical standards

All submissions to Molecular Oncology should conform to standard ethical guidelines, details of which can be found on the website of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). See also Recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals http://www.icmje.org. The journal employs a plagiarism detection system (iThenticate). By submitting your manuscript to this publication you accept that your manuscript may be screened for plagiarism against previously published works.

Human experiments

If the work involves the use of human subjects or tissues, the author should ensure that the work described has been carried out in accordance with Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects (World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki). Authors should include a statement in in the Materials and Methods (Experimental Procedures) section that:

  • the experiments were undertaken with the understanding and written consent of each subject
  • the study methodologies conformed to the standards set by the Declaration of Helsinki
  • the study methodologies were approved by a named local ethics committee.

Animal experiments

All animal experiments should comply with the ARRIVE guidelines. Authors should include in the Materials and Methods (Experimental Procedures) section:

  • a statement indicating that the experiments were performed in accordance with named national legislation, where it exists, or, in its absence, with the named institutional/local body concerned with the ethics of experimentation; for example, in Europe experiments should be carried out in accordance with EU Directive 2010/63/EU for animal experiments, and in the US the National Institutes of Health guidelines for the humane care and use of Laboratory animals (available from http://grants.nih.gov/grants/olaw/olaw.htm) should be followed
  • a full description of the anaesthetic and surgical procedures used, and of peri-operative care
  • evidence that authors took adequate steps to ensure that animals did not suffer unnecessarily at any stage of an experiment, whether acute orchronic

Authorship

Authors are required to meet the criteria for authorship as recommended by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). The specific contributions of each author must be described in an Author Contributions statement.

Authors are expected to consider carefully the list and order of authors before submitting their manuscript and provide the definitive list of authors at the time of the original submission. Any addition, deletion or rearrangement of author names in the authorship list should be made only before the manuscript has been accepted and only if approved by the journal Editor. To request such a change, the Editor must receive the following from the corresponding author: (a) the reason for the change in author list and (b) written confirmation (e-mail, letter) from all authors that they agree with the addition, removal or rearrangement. In the case of addition or removal of authors, this includes confirmation from the author being added or removed.

Only in exceptional circumstances will the Editor consider the addition, deletion or rearrangement of authors after the manuscript has been accepted. While the Editor considers the request, publication of the manuscript will be suspended. If the manuscript has already been published in an online issue, any requests approved by the Editor will result in a corrigendum.

Data sharing

Molecular Oncology encourages authors to share the data behind the results in their paper.

Submission of a research article is taken to imply that authors be willing to make available to academic researchers any materials and protocols used in the experiments reported. Materials include, but are not limited to, cells, DNA, antibodies, reagents, organisms, and mouse strains or, if necessary, the relevant ES cells.

Nucleic acid and protein sequences, macromolecular structures determined by X-ray crystallography (along with structure factors), and microarray data must be deposited in the appropriate public database and must be accessible without restriction from the date of publication. An entry name or accession number must be included in the final version of the manuscript under the heading "Data accessibility". Microarray data should be MIAME compliant ( for guidelines see http://fged.org/projects/miame/).

Molecular Oncology recognizes that authors might also wish to share the raw data underlying other figures and tables included in their paper. To facilitate data sharing, Wiley have partnered with the figshare repository. Authors may upload 'Data Files' as part of the submission process. Data Files will be available to the editors and reviewers, but will not be formally peer reviewed. Upon acceptance of an article, the Data Files will be deposited free of charge to figshare on the author's behalf, with a CC0 license (no rights reserved) applied. The data will be assigned a single DOI, which will be added to a Data Accessibility section in the article. The data on figshare will be linked back to the original article in Molecular Oncology.

VERY IMPORTANT: Data Files provided to figshare must not duplicate existing figures, tables or movies in the main text or supplementary information. Figshare is intended as a repository ONLY for those data that would otherwise not be included in the manuscript (e.g. raw data underlying graphs, uncropped western blots, etc.). Please continue to include as supplementary information any files that are essential to the full understanding of your paper.

Authors must not submit data that is sensitive in nature or should not be made publicly available due to privacy, security, and/or safety concerns, such as human subject data or the location of endangered species.

Further information about this data sharing service is available here: http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828082.html. Please feel free to contact the editorial office at molonc@cancer.dk if you have additional questions.

Open Access publication fee and copyright license

Molecular Oncology is an Open Access journal with no subscribers. All articles will be immediately and permanently free for everyone to read and download. A fee is payable by the author or research funder to cover the costs associated with publication. This ensures each article will be immediately and permanently free for anyone to access. The Open Access publication fee for this journal is $3000, excluding taxes. Authors will be asked to pay the article publication charge on acceptance of their article.

Your institute or funder may have an agreement with Wiley to pay all or some of the article publication charge on your behalf. You can check here. Waivers and discounts are available to authors from countries eligible for the Research4Life programs. You can check the lists of countries here.

If your paper is accepted, the corresponding author for the paper will receive an email prompting them to login into Author Services where, via the Wiley Author Licensing Service (WALS), they will be able to complete the license agreement on behalf of all authors on the paper.

Molecular Oncology offers corresponding authors a Creative Commons Attribution License CC BY. To preview the terms and conditions of this open access agreement, please visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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Preparation of the manuscript

Poorly written articles, as well as spelling and grammatical mistakes, may ultimately lead to the rejection of your article, even though the scientific quality would warrant publication. For more information about language editing and copyediting services pre- and post-submission, visit http://wileyeditingservices.com/en/.

Please use standard fonts (Times, Times New Roman, Arial or Helvetica for general text; Courier or Courier New for sequence alignments; Symbol font for Greek characters and other non-standard characters such as the degree symbol) in your document. Asian-based font sets may produce uncertain results.

Divide your article into clearly defined and numbered sections (NB the abstract is not included in section numbering). Subsections should be numbered 1.1 (then 1.1.1, 1.1.2, ...), 1.2, etc.. Use this numbering for internal cross-referencing; do not just refer to 'the text' or ‘below’. Any subsection may be given a brief heading. Each heading should appear on its own separate line.

Title page

  • Title. This should be concise and informative. See here for suggestions on how to optimize your title and abstract for search engine discoverability. Avoid abbreviations.
  • Author names. These should appear below the title, with the first or middle name of each author given in full. Given names should appear first.
  • Addresses. The laboratories where the work was carried out should be given below the authors' names. If the work was carried out at more than one laboratory, the names of the authors should be followed by superscript numbers, which should also precede the names of the appropriate laboratories.
  • Corresponding author. The full name and address of the author(s) for correspondence, including telephone number and email address, should be given. The author should indicate if any of these details should not be published.
  • Running title.This should contain no more than 50 characters (including spaces).
  • Keywords. Please provide a maximum of 6 keywords, which will be used for indexing purposes. Use American spelling and avoid general and plural terms and multiple concepts (avoid, for example, 'and', 'of'). Only include abbreviations that are firmly established in the field.
  • Abbreviations. Only use abbreviations for terms of excessive length or for those repeated frequently. Define abbreviations that are not standard in this field in a list on the title page. Ensure consistency of abbreviations throughout the article.

Abstract

The abstract should state briefly the purpose of the research, the principal results and major conclusions. The abstract should not contain more than 300 words and should use the terms selected as keywords, to enhance online discoverability. An abstract is often presented separately from the article, so it must be intelligible without reference to other parts of the paper. References, if cited, should be given in full. Abbreviations should be avoided.

Introduction

State the objectives of the work and provide an adequate background, avoiding a detailed literature survey or a summary of the results.

Material and methods

Provide sufficient detail to allow the work to be reproduced. Methods already published should be indicated by a reference: only relevant modifications should be described.

Data accessibility

Please add a statement, giving accession numbers or DOIs of any data related to this paper that are available in a public database or repository. The DOI of any data files deposited in the figshare repository on behalf of an author will be added to this section at proof stage. See Data Sharing for further information.

Results

Results should be clear and concise.

Discussion

This should explore the significance of the results of the work, not repeat them. A combined Results and Discussion section is often appropriate. Avoid extensive citations and discussion of published literature.

Conclusions

The main conclusions of the study may be presented in a short Conclusions section, which may stand alone or form a subsection of a Discussion or Results and Discussion section.

Acknowledgements

Collate acknowledgements in a separate section at the end of the article and before the references. List here those individuals who provided help during the research (e.g., providing language help, writing assistance or proof reading the article, etc.).

Author Contributions

A short description of the contribution of each author (initials only) should be provided in this section. Authors are required to meet the criteria for authorship as recommended by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE)

References

Molecular Oncology uses a (name, date) system for references cited in the text, with the reference list sorted alphabetically. Please ensure that every reference cited in the text is also present in the reference list, and vice versa. Citation of a reference as 'in press' implies that the item has been accepted for publication. Unpublished results and personal communications should not be included in the reference list, but may be mentioned in the text, provided that permission of the relevant person has been obtained. The use of a tool such as EndNote or Reference Manager is recommended for reference management and formatting.

Citations in the text:

  • Single author: the author's name (without initials, unless there is ambiguity) and the year of publication;
  • Two authors: both authors' names and the year of publication;
  • Three or more authors: first author's name followed by 'et al.' and the year of publication.

Citations may be made directly (or parenthetically). Groups of references should be listed first alphabetically, then chronologically: as demonstrated (Allan, 2000a, 2000b, 1999; Allan and Jones, 1999). Kramer et al. (2010) have recently shown ....

Reference list: this should be arranged first alphabetically and then chronologically, if necessary. More than one reference from the same author(s) in the same year must be identified by the letters 'a', 'b', 'c', etc., placed after the year of publication. Journal names should be abbreviated according to the List of Title Word Abbreviations.

Examples:

Reference to a journal publication:

Van der Geer, J., Hanraads, J.A.J., Lupton, R.A., 2010. The art of writing a scientific article. J. Sci. Commun. 163, 51–59.

Mohan, S., Heitzer, E., Ulz, P., Lafer, I., Lax, S., Auer, M., et al., 2014. Changes in colorectal carcinoma genomes under anti-EGFR therapy identified by whole-genome plasma DNA sequencing. Plos Genet. 10(3), e1004271 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1004271

Reference to a book:

Strunk Jr., W., White, E.B., 2000. The Elements of Style, fourth ed. Longman, New York.

Reference to a chapter in an edited book:

Mettam, G.R., Adams, L.B., 2009. How to prepare an electronic version of your article, in: Jones, B.S., Smith , R.Z. (Eds.), Introduction to the Electronic Age. E-Publishing Inc., New York, pp. 281–304.

Reference to a website:

Cancer Research UK, 1975. Cancer statistics reports for the UK. http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/aboutcancer/statistics/cancerstatsreport/ (accessed 13.03.03).

Web references

As a minimum, the full URL should be given and the date when the reference was last accessed. Any further information, if known (DOI, author names, dates, reference to a source publication, etc.), should also be given.

References in a special issue

Please ensure that the words 'this issue' are added to any references in the list (and any citations in the text) to other articles in the same Special Issue.

Math formulae

Please submit math equations as editable text and not as images. Present simple formulae in line with normal text where possible and use the solidus (/) instead of a horizontal line for small fractional terms, e.g., X/Y. In principle, variables are to be presented in italics. Powers of e are often more conveniently denoted by exp. Number consecutively any equations that have to be displayed separately from the text (if referred to explicitly in the text).

Footnotes

Footnotes should be used sparingly. Number them consecutively throughout the article. Please use the footnotes feature in your word processor if one is available. Otherwise, please indicate the position of footnotes in the text and list the footnotes themselves separately at the end of the article. Do not include footnotes in the Reference list.

Database linking

Molecular Oncology articles can contain hyperlinks to relevant external databases, giving readers one-click access to your data. To enable automatic hyperlinking, please ensure that the database identifiers are given in the format:

Database: XXXX

For example, for the entry 1BEN in the Protein Data Bank, use “PDB: 1BEN”.

Tables

Please submit tables as editable text and not as images. Tables should be placed on separate page(s) at the end of the main text. Number tables in the order of their appearance in the text. Place any table notes below the table body. Be sparing in the use of tables and ensure that the data presented in them do not duplicate results described elsewhere in the article. Please avoid using vertical rules.

Figure captions

Figure captions (a title and a brief description of the illustration) should be included with the main text and not in the illustration file. Explain all symbols and abbreviations used in the caption and keep text in the illustrations themselves to a minimum.

Figures

Figures should be numbered in the order of their appearance in the text. Captions should be included with the main text and not in the illustration file.

Colour figures are published at no extra cost. Authors are strongly encouraged to include colour in all figures, including histograms, line graphs, schematics as well as photomicrographs, in order to enhance the quality of data presentation for our readers. In the interest of readers with colour blindness, red-green and blue-yellow colour combinations should be avoided.

Reproduction of a previously published figure should be acknowledged at the end of the figure legend as follows: 'Figure reproduced from [ref. number]'. References to the source should be included in the reference list. For each reproduced figure, it is the authors’ responsibility to check with the relevant publisher whether permission for reproduction is required. Authors should inform the Editorial Office (molonc@cancer.dk) when permission is required for a figure. Permission must be obtained before publication and emailed to the Editorial Office.

Preparation of electronic artwork for publication

Low-quality images are generally acceptable for review purposes. However, for online and print-on-demand publication, high-quality images are required to prevent the final product being blurred or pixelated. Information on the appropriate file formats for electronic graphics is available at http://authorservices.wiley.com/bauthor/illustration.asp.

Sizing guidelines

  • Supply figures at final size widths: 80 mm (single column); 165 mm (double column) or 105 mm (intermediate). Maximum depth is 230 mm. Larger figures will be reduced as appropriate, so please ensure that any line widths and lettering are in proportion to the size of the figure. Figures saved as TIFF, or containing embedded TIFFS, will not be enlarged, as this leads to loss of resolution.
  • Use sans serif, true-type fonts for labels if possible (preferably Arial or Helvetica), and Times (New) Roman if serif fonts required. Use Courier or Courier New for sequence data.
  • Line drawing lettering/lines must be clear. The axes of each graph should be lettered with the numerical scale and the measured quantity with units.
  • Halftones (photographs) must have scale bars where applicable.
  • Multipart figures should be supplied in the final layout in one file, with each part labelled.

File format and resolution guidelines

  • Submit TIFF, EPS or PDF files only.
  • Save line art such as charts, graphs and illustrations in EPS or PDF format. Most programs have a ‘Save as…’ or ‘Export…’ feature to allow you to do this.
  • Save photographic images in TIFF format. These should be saved at final publication size and should have a resolution of at least 300 dpi (dots per inch) at final size.
  • Save figures containing a combination of photographic images and text (e.g. annotated photographic images with text labels) as EPS or PDF. Any photographic images embedded within these should be at least 300 dpi.
  • EPS files should be saved with fonts embedded (and with a TIFF preview if possible).
  • When creating PDF files, it is essential that Press Quality settings (with a resolution of 300 dpi) are used in your PDF-generating software.
  • For scanned images, the scanning resolution (at final image size, see above for a guide to sizes) should be 300 dpi to ensure adequate reproduction.
  • TIFF files can be very large; use LZW compression if possible, as this can greatly reduce the file size. For all TIFF files, it is important not to exceed the resolutions stated. Doing so will not improve the quality of output of your figure, but may produce impractically large files.
  • Perform a visual check of the quality of the generated image. You should be able to zoom in to about 300% without the image becoming noticeably blurred or pixelated. If the image does appear pixelated at this zoom, go back to the original image and check that it complies with the recommended format and settings.

Colour modes

  • Black and white images should be supplied as 'grayscale'.
  • Colour images should be supplied as RGB.

Supporting Information

Supporting Information can support and enhance your scientific research. Supplementary files offer the author additional possibilities to publish supporting applications, high-resolution images, background datasets, sound clips, video and more. Please note that such items are published online exactly as they are submitted; there is no typesetting involved (supplementary data supplied as an Excel file or as a PowerPoint slide will appear as such online). Please submit the material together with the article and supply a concise and descriptive caption for each file. If you wish to make any changes to supplementary data during any stage of the process, then please make sure to provide an updated file, and do not annotate any corrections on a previous version. Please also make sure to switch off the 'Track Changes' option in any Microsoft Office files as these will appear in the published supplementary file(s). For more detailed instructions please visit http://authorservices.wiley.com/bauthor/illustration.asp.

Graphical abstracts

The Journal publishes graphical abstracts in its online table of contents and content alert emails. This is an opportunity to create a concise text summary (or not more than 60 words) together with a clear visual representation of your article's main message to attract potential readers (remember: 'a picture is worth a thousand words'). Ideally, graphical abstract files should be colour images containing one or two graphical elements and should be visually attractive and contain minimal text. The main objective of a graphical abstract file is to capture the main message or topic of your paper, at a glance, drawing the reader towards the article. For examples, see a sample issue at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/febs.2015.282.issue-14/issuetoc.

Cover illustrations

Authors with a colour figure appearing in an accepted paper that they believe would make a good image for the Journal cover are invited to submit a copy of the figure, 21 cm (width) by 16 cm (height), in colour, without any labels or scale bars. Please supply an electronic copy of the figure, with a short legend (max. 15 words), following instructions in the Preparation of electronic artwork for publication section.

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Publication

Author Enquiries

Authors of accepted articles will receive an email from Wiley giving details of the publication process and who to contact if you have any queries post acceptance. You will also be given details of how to pay the article publication fee, which must be received before your article can be published.

All authors are required to register for Author Services. Author Services enables authors to track their article, after acceptance, through the production process to publication online. Authors can check the status of their articles online and choose to receive automated e-mails at key stages of production. The author will receive an e-mail with a unique link that enables them to register and have their article automatically added to the system. Visit the Author Services site for more details on online production tracking, tips on article preparation and submission, and more.

Answers to most queries can be found at http://authorservices.wiley.com/bauthor/default.asp. Answers to queries may be found on the Author FAQs, but if further support is needed Author Support can be contacted at cs-author@wiley.com.

Accepted Articles published online

After your license agreement form has been signed, a copy of your accepted article will be published online on Wiley Online Library as an Accepted Article. Please note that this version will not have been copy-edited, and the PDF version will be the same as your submitted manuscript. Your article will then be typeset and you will receive proofs. The final, corrected version of your article will be posted online once we have received your corrections.

Early View

Early View articles are complete full-text articles published online in the Recently Published section in advance of their inclusion in an issue. Early View articles are the version of record and are complete and final. They have been fully reviewed, revised and edited for publication, and the authors’ corrections have been incorporated. As they are in final form, no changes can be made after online publication. Early View articles are given a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), which allows the article to be cited and tracked before it is allocated to an issue. After issue publication, the DOI remains valid and can continue to be used to cite and access the article.

A copy of this version will also be deposited in the repository PubMed Central. You may also post a copy of this final version in any repository or scholarly professional network (e.g. your institutional repository or ResearchGate).

Online proof correction

We will do everything possible to get your article published quickly and accurately. Molecular Oncology uses a web-based proof correction tool. Your article will be copyedited and typeset, and the corresponding author will then be invited to view the proofs online. All instructions for proofing will be given in the e-mail we send to authors.

It is important to ensure that all corrections are sent back to us in one communication. Please check carefully before replying, as inclusion of any subsequent corrections cannot be guaranteed. Proofreading is solely your responsibility. Please upload all of your corrections within 48 hours. Note that Wiley may proceed with the publication of your article if no response is received.

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News

From January 1, 2017 Molecular Oncology is published by FEBS Press and Wiley

Molecular Oncology has become fully Open Access, allowing everyone to read the journal irrespective of speciality, host institution or location. All articles are published under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY) to meet funders’ requirements worldwide.

Citation Metrics

  • 2015 2-Year Impact Factor: 5.367
  • 2015 5-Year Impact Factor: 6.08
  • 2016 CiteScore: 5.25

Editorial Board

Editor-in-Chief Julio Celis

Senior Associate Editors Anne-Lise Børresen-Dale and  Ulrik Ringborg 

Managing Editor Jose Moreira

Future Events in Oncology

06 - 09 September, 2017, Mainz/Frankfurt, Germany
08 - 12 September, 2017, Madrid, Spain
05 - 06 October, 2017, Buenos Aires, Argentina
13 - 14 October, 2017, Zürich, Switzerland
24 - 27 November, 2017, Milan, Italy
02 - 05 December, 2017, Florida, USA
05 - 09 December, 2017, Texas, USA